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High Salvington Windmill, High Salvington

A wind-powered corn mill in the historic county of Sussex, England.

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The tarred post mill at High Salvington, once known as Durrington Mill, stands 320ft (98m) above sea level, adjacent to Mill Lane, an old roadway into Worthing, and commands a fine view south over Worthing and the sea.

High Salvington Mill has a long history, probably being built about 1750, although the first map showing a mill on this site was printed in 1724. The historical record indicates that a previous mill existed on this site in 1615.

The present mill worked for nearly 150 years until it was closed in 1897. In 1907/8 the old timber roundhouse was replaced with an octagonal concrete structure with large windows that was used as a tea room well into the 1950s.

Worthing Borough Council purchased the mill for £2,250 in 1959. Edwin Hole & Son, millwrights, of Burgess Hill, undertook restoration work in the early 1960s, replacing a lot of the heavy timberwork in the main body of the mill.

As a result of damage sustained during a gale in 1976, an inspection was carried out and revealed that the state of the mill was far from well. The High Salvington Mill Trust was inaugurated and a decision taken to completely restore the mill.

The hurricane of 1987 gave the mill its first taste of renewed life. The great wind turned the single pair of sails for the first time, although the brake was on!

The original style of circular roundhouse, visible in several old photographs and postcards, was reinstated in 1990, and the mill began grinding again on 4th April 1991.

Inside the mill are two pairs of millstones set in a head-and-tail arrangement, driven by an enormous renewed brake wheel and the original tail wheel. The windshaft is of wood, with a cast-iron poll end, and carries two spring-shuttered sails and two canvas-spread common sails.

The mill is cared for by The High Salvington Mill Trust Ltd.

Website

Full details

Alternative names Durrington Mill
Power source Wind
Mill type Post mill
Mill function Corn mill
Archive ID 2581
Location High Salvington
Historic county Sussex
Country England, United Kingdom
NGR TQ 123 067
Latitude/longitude 50.84861600, -0.40652100

Location

Gallery

  • Old postcard view of the mill in working trim, c1900, with its last working sweeps, a pair of springs and a pair of commons
  • A glass plate negative from the 1920s or 30s. At this time the mill was used as a tea house
  • Early interior view showing part of the clasp-arm brake wheel, stone nut and head stones
  • Interior view of the roundhouse, taken during the 1980s by Frank Gregory
  • Following a survey of its condition, the sweepless mill is pronounced dangerous and is fenced off prior to the start of repairs
  • Now stabilised with a heavy steel framework, the mill is ready to welcome visitors. This photograph was taken on one of the first open days
  • Volunteers work at the top of the mill to re-board the roof, summer 1985. Note the additional felt layer under the weatherboarding
  • Restoration of the mill is at an advanced stage. The mill body has been repaired and one pair of common sweeps has been made and fitted
  • A new wire machine flour dresser has been built to a traditional pattern and fitted at the rear of the mill
  • The final phase of restoration has been completed (compare with first photograph)
  • Photo: Sara & Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara & Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara & Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman
  • Photo: Sara and Oscar Jarman

References

Contributors

Sara & Oscar Jarman, April 2017, May 2017

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