Publication:

Die Kappenwindmühle Westfälisches Freilichtmuseum Detmold

    Full details

    English titleThe cap winder, Westphalian open air museum Detmold
    Authors & editors

    Schulte, Ingrid [Author]
    Grossmann, G Ulrich [Author]

    Publisher Landschaftsverband Westfalen-Lippe
    Year of publication 1980
    Languages

    German (main text)

    Medium Book
    Edition1
    Topics

    Scope & contentSummary TranslationA detailed guide to the cap winder mill originally from Tonnenheide in Rahden in North Rhine-Westphalia. It starts with a history of its location and of the changing ownership of mills in general in the area. The mill was originally built in 1789 and rebuilt after a fire in 1842. The text describes the economic difficulties of the mill and lists the successive millers. The last miller family died out in 1962, it was dismantled in 1966 and brought to the museum and rebuilt from 1974 to 1978. As of 1980 it was brought back into operation by an employee of the Landschaftsverband which owns it.The second part of the book explains in great detail the architecture and technology of the mill, starting with a general introduction to windmills before relating this to the Tonnenheide mill. It ends with a tour of the mill, and a description of changes made during its reconstruction which returned it to the state it was in in 1842.The soft-cover booklet is illustrated with diagrams and black-and-white photos. A map on the endpaper shows the location of the mill.
    KeywordsMillwrighting, Milling, Germany, Cereals, Family history, People, Archaeology & history

    Copies held

    Accession no. 230021

    • Shelf location: W114.3_SCH
    • Notes: Summary TranslationA detailed guide to the cap winder mill originally from Tonnenheide in Rahden in North Rhine-Westphalia. It starts with a history of its location and of the changing ownership of mills in general in the area. The mill was originally built in 1789 and rebuilt after a fire in 1842. The text describes the economic difficulties of the mill and lists the successive millers. The last miller family died out in 1962, it was dismantled in 1966 and brought to the museum and rebuilt from 1974 to 1978. As of 1980 it was brought back into operation by an employee of the Landschaftsverband which owns it.The second part of the book explains in great detail the architecture and technology of the mill, starting with a general introduction to windmills before relating this to the Tonnenheide mill. It ends with a tour of the mill, and a description of changes made during its reconstruction which returned it to the state it was in in 1842.The soft-cover booklet is illustrated with diagrams and black-and-white photos. A map on the endpaper shows the location of the mill.